Operating-Department-Practitioner

BSc (Hons) Operating Department Practice Operating Department Practitioner (Integrated Degree) Apprenticeship* This course is only available to applicants via an apprenticeship scheme.

Year of entry

This course is only available to applicants via an apprenticeship scheme.

Operating Department Practice is an exciting and rewarding career that involves working with many different patient groups undergoing a variety of anaesthetic and surgical interventions. Successful completion of the Operating Department Practitioner degree apprenticeship gives you eligibility to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council as an Operating Department Practitioner (ODP). The programme will equip you with the knowledge, skills and professional attitudes to meet the needs of patients, employers and other health and social care professionals you may work with. The focus for this programme is on the experience of the patient throughout their perioperative journey and the role of practitioners delivering care primarily within three core areas identified as: the anaesthetic phase, the surgical phase and the post anaesthetic (recovery) phase, within an interprofessional approach to perioperative care.

The role of the Operating Department Practitioner (ODP) is continually evolving and is moving beyond the traditional confines of the hospital operating department. ODPs now contribute to patient care in an increasingly wide variety of healthcare settings wherever anaesthetic assistance is required. For example, ODPs now attend emergency care departments, CT or MRI scanning and Endoscopy units as a valued member of the interprofessional anaesthetic team. The benefit of undertaking the Operating Department Practitioner degree apprenticeship is that as well as earning while you work towards BSc (Hons) HE level 6 academic study, you will also gain the appropriate knowledge and clinical skills to enable you to contribute fully to the perioperative multi-disciplinary team.

The aim of the apprenticeship is to enable you to become an adaptable, effective, confident, capable, safe practitioner. As a graduate of this apprenticeship, you will be fit for practice and fit for purpose by gaining a broad knowledge and skills base, that will allow you to meet the needs of various perioperative patient groups. In addition, you will gain graduate and profession specific attributes that will allow you to work alongside other health professions to enable successful collaboration in the assessment, delivery and evaluation of perioperative care. The benefits of the apprenticeship programme will be learning new skills whilst in employment; working across a variety of settings you will acquire practice-based skills learnt in a clinical environment. These skills will underpin and support knowledge gained in university.

No two patients are the same, no two operations are the same. Variety and the unexpected are at the heart of operating department practice. so, if you are looking for a career where every day brings new challenges and experiences, and where you can make a real difference to those in need of care and support. Operating department practice is a good choice.

Why Choose ODP at Canterbury Christ Church University?

  • We developed and had approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) the first BSc (Hons) Operating Department Practice degree in the UK
  • The country's first students to graduate with a degree in Operating Department Practice (ODP)
  • Specialist provider for ODP education for over 24 years
  • Dedicated team of experience and specialised staff

A culture of student support and wellbeing.

The Operating Department Practitioner degree apprenticeship programme is underpinned by a strong interprofessional education theme which focuses on collaborative working within healthcare settings. University learning will support and reinforce your workplace learning where you will be able to apply your knowledge and learn more about the clinical side of being an Operating Department Practitioner. Similarly, workplace learning will support and reinforce University learning, so that theory and practice support each other in the development of knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to become an ODP. In years one and two you will study 4 academic modules across a broad range of subjects and one 40 credit practice learning module. In year three you will undertake 4 academic modules and a 20-credit practice module. The final 20 level 6 credits will be attributed to the end-point assessment which will take place in the first trimester of year four.

To ensure you experience the most current and relevant education, the course has been designed to reflect the rapidly evolving dimensions of the health and social care sector and the needs of the individual perioperative patient.

Your studies will focus on operating department practice interlinked with learning with and from others to prepare you for your future working environments. Studying operating department practice means you will gain academic knowledge and practical skills to equip you to support the perioperative stage of surgical intervention: pre, during and post operation. You could be preparing equipment for a routine procedure, responding to an emergency, helping to calm and reassure patients. Variety and stamina are a big part of the profession and we aim to prepare you for this by teaching, guiding and supporting you throughout your studies on the course.

In addition to studying at university, you will undertake clinical placements within hospital operating departments and other healthcare areas to help you understand the patient's journey and the work of others involved in the patients care. This is undertaken alongside qualified practitioners, enabling you to develop your knowledge and skills under direct supervision and helping you become familiar with the regulations for standards of practice and accountability within the ODP profession.

This course allows you to be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council upon successful completion of the course.

Year one of the programme will consist of level four study and is concerned primarily with the introduction of concepts and principles that underpin Operating Department Practice. As an apprentice you will be introduced to biological, sociological, psychological and behavioural concepts that will facilitate the development and understanding of the specialist needs of a patient throughout the perioperative experience. The first year of the apprenticeship is designed to serve as a foundation for ODP apprentices who will learn about professional expectations and values, the structure of health and social care, academic expectations, skills for practice and the role and responsibilities of an ODP in a modern health service.

Academic Skills 1 (20 credits)

The aim of this first-year module is to enable you to gain foundation-level skills for effective study throughout the programme by using a range of academic, professional and interpersonal skills while gaining awareness of evidence bases related to perioperative care. The module extends the induction process and familiarises you with requirements for university study in Health and Well-Being via learning activities and engagement with university services, including supporting ‘international students and non-native English speakers’ This module provides the base for further development in years 2 and 3. You will be assessed via an essay and PDP course workbook.

Anaesthetic 1 (20 credits)

This module introduces you to the anaesthetic setting and your role in assisting the anaesthetist. The basic principles of perioperative anaesthetic care and associated subject content will be identified including relevant equipment, underpinning pharmacology, anaesthesia techniques as well as the assessment, planning and implementation of patient care. You will be assessed via a 2-hour unseen examination and an anaesthetic written workbook.

Clinical Skills 1 (40 credits)

The aim of this module is to support practice learning and help you to further develop knowledge and skills for safe and effective perioperative care. You will be assessed via a Practice Assessment Document (PAD) which incorporates a requirement to reflect on their Anaesthetic, Surgery and ward experiences (this will be on a pass/fail grade).

Human Biology 1 (20 credits)

This module introduces you to the normal structure and function of the human body, in order to help them understand how principles of the human biology relate to normal activities of living. You will be assessed via A 2-hour unseen examination and course work book.

Surgery 1 (20 credits)

This module will provide you with a broad introduction to the fundamental surgical skills, principles and theoretical knowledge necessary for working within the sterile field. In addition to learning about the management of patients undergoing surgical intervention and individualised patient care, you will gain an understanding of the principles of asepsis, infection control and the importance of maintaining homeostasis. The aim of this module is to introduce you to your role and responsibilities as a scrub practitioner. You will be assessed via an essay related to a minor/intermediate surgical procedure utilising evidence-based practice in surgery in relation to safe perioperative practice and written course workbook.

Year 2

Year 2 aims to cover the development of more complex topics: professional development, advancing anaesthetic practice, pathophysiology for operating department practice, advancing surgical practice and immediate postoperative care. During this year practice placements aim to extend your capacity in applying theory to practice and extend your clinical practice competence. Like the first year, the nature of clinical placements means the taught component relating to anaesthetic, surgery and post anaesthetics will develop the clinical competencies necessary to practice safely and effectively as an ODP in all three phases of perioperative care; the anaesthetic phase, the surgical phase and the post anaesthetic (recovery) phase.

Academic Skills 2 (20 credits)

The aim of this module is to provide you with a framework to find, assess and evaluate sources of evidence used in the perioperative practice setting. This module builds on the Academic Skills 1 module that was undertaken in year 1 and will continue the development of Graduate Skills. You will be assessed by you undertaking a systematic search of evidence on a perioperative topic of their choice. Once the search strategy has been conducted, you will choose one source of evidence identified through their search strategy to critique using an appropriate critiquing framework. The chosen source of evidence will then be examined and critiqued in more detail, addressing aspects identified within the critiquing framework

Anaesthetic 2 (20 credits)

On this module you will further develop your skills, competencies and knowledge in assisting the anaesthetist. The module will build upon the basic concepts of anaesthetic practice introduced in year 1 and further develop your ability to become a safe, efficient and capable practitioner. You will be introduced to basic electrocardiograph interpretation and the use of 12 lead ECG for diagnostic purposes. Social and cognitive skills identified as ‘non-technical’ skills will be introduced to aid the development of professional skills. You will be assessed via a 20-minute presentation related to the anaesthetic phase of care. In addition, you will complete an anaesthetic workbook.

Clinical Skills 2 (40 credits)

The aim of this module is to support practice learning and help you to further develop professional knowledge, skills and experience in partnership with other professionals to optimise outcomes for a range of surgical patient groups. You will be assessed via a Practice Assessment Document (PAD) which incorporates a requirement to reflect on your Anaesthetic, Surgery and ward experiences (this will be on a pass/fail grade).

Introduction to Recovery (20 credits)

This module aims to equip you with the theory supporting and rationalising safe, effective care of adult patients recovering from elective surgery, introducing post-operative care principles and embracing HCPC (2014) Standards of Proficiency relevant to post-anaesthetic and surgical care in practice. The module aims to establish foundations for further development in year three and introduces you to your first autonomous rolein theatre.The assessment for this module will be a case study related to the post anaesthetic and surgical phase of care, in addition to a recovery workbook.

Surgery 2 (20 credits)

On this module you will further develop your skills, competencies and knowledge in assisting the surgeon for both elective and non-elective procedures. The module will build upon the basic concepts of surgical practice introduced in year 1 and further develop your ability to become safe, efficient and capable surgical practitioners. Social and cognitive skills identified as ‘non-technical’ skills will be introduced to aid the development of professional skills. Legal and ethical issues will be explored focussing on accountability and responsibility implications of the surgical practitioner role. The assessment for the module an essay identifying an aspect of practice development related to surgical care in addition to a surgical workbook.

Year 3

Year 3 aims to enhance and support your development as a safe, effective and competent operating department practitioner. Topics include: development and enhancement of professional practice, surgical first assistant, immediate post-operative care, caring for seriously ill patients, leadership and management. Preparation for the workplace and enhancing your reflective practice form part of your placement learning for the final years of the course.

Academic Skills 3 (20 credits)

This module aims to showcase your ability to undertake an extended piece of systematic, reflective, critical enquiry into an aspect of perioperative practice of their choosing. This module is focussed on a topic of particular interest to you and you will work under the guidance of an academic supervisor, with extra support provided through seminars and lectures. The module continues to build on the ‘Academic Skills 1’ and ‘Academic Skills 2’ undertaken in years 1 and 2 to continue the development of Graduate Skills. This module will encourage you to manage your time effectively, organise your ideas and extend and compliment content from previous modules. The assessment for this module will be to produce a systematic, reflective, critical enquiry into a relevant aspect of operating department practice (6000 words).

Anaesthetic 3 (20 credits)

This module will build upon the year 2 anaesthetic module with a focus on complex care and critically ill patient management. Leadership and management capabilities will be developed to enable you to provide leadership when required. Social and cognitive skills identified as ‘non-technical’ skills will be further developed to promote your ability to become adept at team leadership, to be situationally aware and to develop confidence in the management or resolution of conflict. The assessment for the module will be a case study critiquing an aspect of anaesthetic/critical care afforded to a specific patient.

Clinical skills 3 (20 credits)

On this module you will develop your practice as an autonomous ODP, assessing patients in theatres and associate areas, exercising professional judgement to establish patient centred goals, and to accept, plan, initiate, modify, refer or cease treatment within prescribed limits. The assessment for the module will be through completion of a Practice Assessment Document (PAD) (assessed as pass/fail) which incorporates a requirement to reflect on their Anaesthetic, Surgery and Recovery experiences.

Extended Recovery Skills (20 credits)

This module aims to foster deeper understanding of complex and vulnerable patients including adults, obstetric patients and children and incorporates inter-professional learning in surgical and in other critical care areas according to HCPC (2014) Standards of Proficiency for Operating Department Practitioners.  This module develops the autonomous practice introduced in year 2 extending beyond theatre boundaries and embracing inter-professional collaboration within acute and critical care environs aiming to inform confident, capable practitioners who will meet the changing needs of the populations and employers they work with. The assessment will be via a 2-hour unseen examination and a recovery workbook.

Surgery 3 (20 credits)

This module builds upon the year 2 surgical skills module focusing on specific competencies and knowledge to enable you to develop confidence in assisting the surgeon.  Social and cognitive skills identified as ‘non-technical’ skills will be further developed to promote your ability to become adept at team working, to be situationally aware, to maintain standards of good practice and to problem solve appropriately. You will be assessed via an essay identifying an aspect of practice development related to surgical care.

Year 4 will consist of one trimester (September to January) during which time the End Point Assessment (EPA) will take place. The EPA is part of the integrated degree apprenticeship for Operating Department Practitioners and contributes the final 20 level 6 academic credits to the integrated degree. Your employer, in consultation with the programme team, will confirm when you are eligible to progress to the EPA during this final trimester. The EPA is an independent assessment that tests the achievement of the necessary knowledge, skills and behaviours identified in the apprenticeship standard and can be considered ‘job ready’.

End-point Assessment (EPA) (20 credits)

The end-point assessment will provide independent synoptic assessment of the knowledge, skills and behaviours of the apprenticeship standard. The assessment will deliver a valid, reliable and independent judgement that you have achieved the standard required to complete the apprenticeship as an ODP. The assessment for this module will be via a Professional Discussion of 60 minutes +/- 10% at the discretion of the assessor. Questions will be targeted to address each domain of the Knowledge, Skills and Behaviours outlined in the Standard ST0582.  You must be able to relate the questions to your practice and demonstrate you are able to work within the parameters of practice and know what to do should you be placed in a situation that would test the limits of these. The Professional Discussion is graded as Fail / Pass / Distinction. In addition, a live observation of practice will take place lasting 90 minutes +/- 10% at the discretion of the assessor. You will be observed in providing perioperative care to an individual or succession of individuals. Following the 90-minute observation you will participate in a 30 minute follow up question and answer session +/- 10% at the discretion of the assessor. The purpose of the follow up questions is to confirm your competence. The Observation is graded as Fail / Pass.

Within the programme all modules are compulsory and are core to your overall studies. Therefore, for this reason all theory/academic components of every module must be passed and all practice placement competences must be passed to progress to the next year and level of study.

Newly qualified operating department practitioners typically start their careers on a band 5 (NHS) before progressing to higher bands following professional development and experience over a period of time.

Since graduating from Canterbury Christ Church University, a number of our students have gone on to roles in major teaching hospitals in London. Others have gained employment locally with the NHS and the private/independent sector, while others are working further afield.

With experience, additional education and training, you could go on to any number of roles in the UK and abroad. These may include: non-medically qualified anaesthetist (anaesthesia associate), physicians associate, surgical care practitioner, resuscitation training officer, transplant teams, Accident and Emergency, Intensive Therapy Units – (ITU), management; education.

The academic year runs from September until August each year and is divided in to three 15-week trimesters. During each trimester, you will have three taught weeks at University (thus meeting the 20% requirement ‘off the job training’). You can usually expect to be in university for up to 5 days during each of these university weeks. The remainder of your time will be spent in the Operating Department of your workplace where you will experience a wide range of anaesthetic and surgical interventions.  However, in order to develop a wider understanding of the health care setting and the needs of patients, your employer may require you to attend other settings such as a ward area, A&E/ITU or HDU. In some instances, your workplace will not be able to provide clinical experience of all the required specialities you will need. In this instance, you may need to travel to another clinical setting, within the same trust or at an alternative site. This will be arranged on an individual basis, according to the experiences that need to be gained at an external site. When not attending University, you will be expected to complete the normal working week of your employer (usually a 37½ hour week). This will include early shifts, late shifts and as you progress will also include weekends and night shifts. The exact pattern will depend on the working practices of your employer.

Your feedback is important to us and learning and teaching strategies will involve you as an active participant in the quality assurance and enhancement of the programme. The aim of the programme is to be stimulating in our subject delivery using the evidence base of practice and to maximise your learning potential throughout. Ultimately, you will become self-directed in your studies and take responsibility for being an independent learner. Although most of the learning will take place in the workplace, a minimum of 20% of your time will be spent on ‘off the job training’(OJT), during which you will be taught through the use of lectures, seminars, group discussion, and reflection using experiences from clinical practice. You will be supported with tutorials as well as seminars with focussed discussion linking theory to practice, and self-directed study via and the virtual learning environment which will provide additional resources such as power point presentations, evidence-based materials, web links and audio-visual aids. The taught programme will also be using a ‘flipped learning’ approach for some of the modules where you will be given topics to explore as directed study which are then discussed in depth with lecturers in University, creating rich learning opportunities and making the most of classroom time. A flipped classroom approach involves you being provided with learning resources to use at any time outside of the classroom. This material will include such resources as narrated power points, lecture capture, podcasts, online books and articles and short tests and quizzes. This style of learning will equip you with the skills of enquiry that you will need for a lifelong career of learning as well as allowing you the flexibility to learn at your own pace when and where you wish. The virtual learning environment (VLE), is used extensively to support your learning by providing resources and activities such as discussion boards and guided reflection as well as being a repository for programme related information.

Blended learning (understood as the integration of face-to-face and on-line learning opportunities) will be featured, with extensive provision of digital resources to augment content delivery sessions. Digital media will be used to enhance group work and personal reflection on the learning journey (for instance through the use of blogs as a mode of assessment and learning, a programme such as Pebble Pad to manage apprentice self-learning).

Clinical skills to help develop your practice competence will be taught in our Simulation suite, where we have a state-of-the-art teaching facility for healthcare professionals. These includes a fully equipped simulated operating theatre and scrub room, both of which enable you to integrate theory and clinical practice learning. This will enable you to gain the appropriate perioperative clinical skills in a safe and controlled environment. The clinical placements will facilitate practice learning to support the clinical skills required to meet the module competences. Integration of theoretical and practice learning will ensure you understand the relationship between theoretical knowledge, evidence-based practice and safe clinical professional practice in preparation for your transition through the course.

At the beginning of the programme, you will be allocated a personal academic tutor who is a member of university teaching staff. They will provide regular tutorial support during the programme. The same personal academic tutor may also be your link tutor when you are in clinical practice but if not, you will also have a link tutor assigned to the practice learning area.

The learning and teaching strategies will involve you as an active participant in the quality assurance and enhancement of the course. The aim of the course is to be stimulating and evidence based in its delivery therefore maximising your learning potential.

Independent Learning

You will complete work-books at your own pace and will be encouraged to appraise and manage their development producing a personal development plan. Learning is encouraged via electronic packages and self-directed study is introduced with both peer and tutor feedback to foster a cohesive, interactive learning cohort equipped with interpersonal feedback skills preparing you for communication both as practitioners and in the wider environment while fostering the concept of life-long learning and managing own development. You will have experience of lectures, seminars, group work and technology-enhanced learning throughout the programme. You will be introduced to models and tools for reflective practice and encouraged toward regular shared e-reflection via an electronic blog and practice supervision. Ultimately, you will become self-directed in your studies and take responsibility for being an independent learner.

The programme team believe that the most appropriate way for ODP apprentices to develop a sound knowledge base and practical expertise, is through a facilitative education approach. The apprenticeship aims to stimulate self-directed learning, develop and encourage critical analysis and promote reflective practice. This is in keeping with the philosophy that apprentices will learn most effectively if allowed to take responsibility for their own learning and make contributions from their own experience. The theoretical component draws on the latest practice developments, analysing these in light of research and evidence-based practice. The programme team endorse the need for interprofessional education and will create opportunities to work with other staff and apprentices within the Faculty and wider university.

Work Load

All theory components of every module must be passed, all practice competences must be achieved and all placement hours must be completed in order to successfully progress to the next year and level of study. You must also sign a declaration of suitability each year to say you are of good health and good character.

You can usually expect to be in university up to 5 days every week when engaging with your 20% off the job training. This usually equates to 3 weeks in every 15-week trimester.

You will adhere to the normal working pattern of your employer which, during the course of the apprenticeship, may include a variety of shifts including weekends, nights, early and late shifts to provide clinical experience that supports the complexity of the level of study.  You will need to complete a minimum of 900 hours each year in the apprentice ODP role. This equates to 2700 hours over three years plus approximately 300 hours in the first trimester of the fourth year while you are preparing for the end-point assessment. This equates to the practice hours achieved by you on the direct entry undergraduate programme and demonstrates parity between the routes through the programme.  The hours completed for each shift are recorded in the attendance hours record within the PAD and verified by the mentor as part of the supervision process. If you miss 4 weeks or more of placement, for whatever reason, including a delay in disclosure and barring scheme (DBS) or occupational health clearance, you will be required to have an interview with the programme director and your employer to discuss whether you need to interrupt your studies and re-join at an appropriate point the following year.

Academic Input

All staff involved in the teaching of this programme are registered professionals and are experienced teachers, either currently involved in research or delivering research informed teaching. Within the ODP team three of five staff are senior lecturers and have engaged with research to Masters Level. One is currently completing his PhD research studies. Other roles adopted by staff include peer reviewer for national professional journals, external examiner and professional reviewers at other Universities. They are research-active, and have experience in delivering research-informed teaching. You can find out more about the current teaching on our Schoolwebpage.

The programme also utilises the experience of expert practitioners including consultant anaesthetists, Surgical Care Practitioners and surgeons as well as the expertise of other professions within the university such as nurses and paramedics.

A member of the teaching team has been awarded the Fellowship from the College of Operating Department Practitioners for services to the profession.

In order to meet the different learning styles of apprentices and to align with the module content, a variety of assessment methods are used within the modules for each year. Your understanding of theory will be assessed in a variety of ways and different formats such as; essays, case studies, exams, written coursework (workbooks), online assessments, and presentations. You will also be encouraged to keep a reflective log of your time as an apprentice to demonstrate your progress and development on the programme. The practice elements of modules are assessed in clinical practice by Practice Educators and other staff with a relevant professional background.  Practice modules are assessed on a pass/fail basis and are detailed in Practice Assessment Document (PAD). You will need to pass every module in order to pass each year and the programme as well as the gateway requirements identified in order to be put forward by your employer for the end-point assessment (EPA).

The ‘Safe Medicate’ software package is utilised within the ODP pathway. This is an online medication dosage calculation package that develops and assesses your numeracy skills. The package enables you to develop numeracy skills from the most basic level to more complex calculations whilst ensuring application to practice. You will be required to produce evidence of engagement with the software test at the end of year 2 (level 5) (90% pass mark) and at the end of year 3 (level 6) (100% pass mark). This will need to be completed in class although you will be entitled to access the software as often as you want to throughout the year. You will be given a username and password at the start of year 2 of your programme.

To graduate you must achieve 360 credits (120 in years 1 and 2, 100 in year 3 plus the 20 credits associated with the EPA in year 4) and pass all practice. You will also receive an overall grade of Pass or Distinction for the apprenticeship and this is determined by the independent assessor following the end-point.

While in placement you must conform to NHS rules of appearance and conduct as set out by your employer /placement provider.

You are required to pass all modules in each year to enable you to progress to the following year of study. All modules must be passed at a minimum of 40% within the academic component of the module. Clinical practice is graded on a pass or fail basis and must also be passed before you can progress to the following year.

During placement you will be required to attend the same shift times as your mentor i.e. 37½ hours per week. This is because once you are in employment after qualifying as an ODP you will undertake the same working hours within the operating department. This ensures that you experience the full range of activity in your individual clinical placement. Shifts could include weekends, bank holidays and night duty.

Owing to the varied nature of the specialist experiences required to complete the programme, there may be a need for you to travel to another Trust different to your employing one. This is because some Trusts are unable to provide clinical experience for all the required specialities. If this is the case, you will need to travel to another clinical setting, which may be within the same trust or at an alternative site. These could be within Kent, Surrey, Sussex and London, this is so you can also gain experience from some specialist operating department settings.

The Programme meets the requirements of the College of Operating Department Practitioners curriculum and is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council.

On completion of the course and in preparation for registration, the Programme Director must be satisfied that you meet the relevant statutory regulatory body fitness to practise criteria. You will be required to sign an annual declaration of ongoing fitness to practise at regular intervals during the course. The Faculty of Health and Wellbeing has a Fitness to Practise policy and procedures which may be instigated should you demonstrate behaviour or conduct that falls short of that expected by the University and/or statutory regulatory body. More details. In addition as you will be an employee undertaking the apprenticeship you will be responsible and accountable to your employing NHS Trust/organisation for any areas of misconduct. 

To be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council you must demonstrate good health and good character throughout your studies and on completion. Applications for professional registration will be subject to satisfactory Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) checks and Occupational Health clearance.

The Simulation Suite at our Medway Campus is set up as a hospital environment with a fully equipped simulated operating theatre and scrub room to help you integrate theory and clinical practice learning. Within the Simulation Suite we have several patient simulators (patient mannequins) which are used extensively, and can simulate vital physiological signs and symptoms of patient conditions and illness. This enables the core skills of airway management, respiration, cardiac, circulation management and patient care to be learnt in a safe and controlled environment. In addition, you will be able to develop and enhance your surgical skills within the simulation suite at the Medway Campus. Read more.

There are also lecture theatres and a large learning resource/library which has shared access with neighbouring universities.

We work very closely with the NHS and the private and independent healthcare sector, and your practice learning will be in these settings.

Fact file

UCAS institution code

  • C10

Length

  • 3 years and one trimester full-time. There is no part-time route.

Starts

  • September

Entry requirements

  • Standard university requirements apply namely; a minimum of 5 GCSEs at grade A- C including English and Maths and a level 3 qualification; for example, NVQ 3, BTEC national diploma or A levels in a related subject area. You must also have a satisfactory Enhanced Disclosure and Barring service check as well as meet the requirements of your employers Occupational Health screening. In line with the Health and Care Professions Council standards of proficiency (2014) standard 8.3, where English is not your first language you will also require an International English Language Testing System (IELTS) score of 7.0 with no element below 6.5.

Location

School

Last edited 11/09/2019 14:12:00

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Last edited: 11/09/2019 14:12:00