frtv-course-page-570

BA single honours Film, Radio and
Television Studies with Foundation Year
2017/18

Year of entry

Great news!

We now have planning permission to build a new £12m arts facility in Canterbury, equipped with the latest technology and bespoke learning spaces for our arts and humanities students. We expect our new arts building to open on the main campus in September 2018, with building work starting this summer.

Find out more about these specialist facilities in our video.

FRTV Studies students gave a rating of 92% for teaching quality

National Student Survey, 2016

A number of our degrees are also offered with an additional foundation year (Year 0). Whether you are a school-leaver or someone considering returning to study but don’t have the entry requirements for your chosen subject, a foundation year course may be just what you’re looking for.

A foundation year is the first year of a four year programme which:

  • provides an introduction not only to study at University but also to your chosen subject
  • offers you a highly supportive environment where you can develop the self-confidence, knowledge, skills and understanding for further study.

Following your Foundation Year in Film, Radio and Television Studies you will have access to:

  • Our £350,000 refurbished TV studio and gallery
  • Film and post production kit including the Arri Amira, Steadycams, the DJI Osmo, AVID and Pro Tools.

You will explore areas including:

  • film production
  • radio production
  • television production
  • critical theory and the creative industries

Studying Film, Radio and Television at Canterbury Christ Church University offers the chance to learn about a variety of media before specialisation. In addition, you will be expected to explore the interface between practice and theory in a way that will enhance creativity, analytical skills and communication in a programme that embeds employability into its structure and which is delivered by passionate and approachable staff. You’ll have access to excellent equipment and be encouraged to work both as part of a team and individually in ways that will help to develop transferable skills that are vital in the developing media landscape while simultaneously giving you the opportunity to explore and develop your own relationship with media arts.

We have professional standard television and radio studios, computing suites and portable equipment. We have an industry advisory panel and constantly use industry professionals to supplement full-time academics.

While your first year will revolve around core modules, that introduce you to the three traditional media and theoretical approaches to them, years two and three are shaped by your optional modules and offer a choice of practical and theoretical modules that allow you to specialise but also develop new and complementary skills and interests.

We have our own purpose-built specialist facilities where you’ll make films, television shows and radio features in your first year before choosing from a range of optional modules that might include animation, documentary, screenwriting, editing, cinematography and a variety of theoretical modules ranging from American independent cinema or popular television through to editing theory in your second year. In the third year, while you maintain the practice theory balance, you can take a traditional or a mixed media dissertation or you can opt for a course geared at preparing you for a career in the media. Alternatively you might explore the software required for live cinema. Through engagement with a dedicated team of full-time academics, through input from industry professionals as guest speakers, associate lecturers or through their input to the Industry Advisory Panel, you can depend on the programme maintaining industry standards while also allowing you the creative space to explore your own artistic and creative potential and the intellectual stimulation to expand your horizons and challenge yourself daily.

You can study French, German, Italian, Mandarin Chinese and Spanish as part of, or alongside, your course.

more info

 

Work experience

There are a number of work related learning modules which are client based and provide students with experience of industry demands and standards. Media Production in Year 3 responds to client briefs, Real Time Visual Performance combines self-initiated projects with client based work. Professional Perspectives in the Creative Industries has assessed work based on group responses to client briefs.

The Powell Building was named after local filmmaker Michael Powell and opened by his widow Thelma Schoonmaker Powell. Thelma is Martin Scorsese’s editor and has returned to offer master-classes and guest lectures to our students when her schedule has allowed.

Foundation Year Zero

Students on all of the  Faculty of Arts and Humanities Foundation Year courses will undertake 80 credits of generic core modules introducing them to study in the arts and humanities and university level skills, namely:

  • Academic Writing and Study Skills
  • Personal and Career Development
  • Understanding Arts and Humanities
  • Being Human: an Introduction to the Humanities

In addition you will be offered two 20 credit optional modules, one to be studied in each semester. The full list of optional modules is as follows and you will be placed onto the modules which most effectively complement your degree pathway choice and, where applicable, your study interests:

  • Dangerous Ideas
  • Foundation English Language and Communication
  • Foundation English Literature
  • Foundation Media and Communications
  • Analysing British Cinema
  • Historical Foundations
  • America and the World (subject to validation)
  • Music and Performing Arts in Context
  • The Languages and Theory of Music

Optional Modules associated with Degree Pathway in Semester 1 (S1) and Semester 2 (S2)

  • Foundation Media and Communications S1
  • Analysing British Cinema S2

Core modules

Year 1

Critical Approaches to Film, Radio and Television Studies

This module aims to introduce you to a number of critical/theoretical approaches to film, radio and television; it aims to give some sense of the historical discourses surrounding these media, while also applying critical/theoretical approaches to contemporary developments; lastly, though implicit rather than explicit, it aims to provide a basic critical/theoretical context for your practical work.

Introduction To Radio and Television Production (combined honours only)

This module aims to introduce you to the safe and effective use of radio and television equipment and techniques relating to their use. It aims to provide opportunities for you to develop organisational, creative and technical skills within the context of radio and television production. Additionally it aims to provide opportunities to develop team skills within radio and television production and to integrate initial theoretical concepts within practical productions.

Theoretical and Practical Approaches to Moving Image Production (combined honours only)

The module aims to establish productive links between film and television theory and creative practice, enabling you to situate your own moving image practice within a theoretical context, and also encouraging you to explore theoretical concerns through practical work. The module seeks to introduce you to a number of critical/theoretical approaches to the study of film and television, and to provide opportunities to develop creative skills in moving image production.

Readings Meanings and Texts (single honours only)

The aim of the module is to establish the specific skills required to interpret texts in relation to broader cultural and industrial contexts across the three media of film, radio and television. The module introduces, develops and applies analytical skills appropriate for each medium. The module focuses on developing the appropriate language required to enable you to confidently analyse texts and provides a foundation for close textual analysis which will inform their work throughout the degree. This module also provides a theoretical context for your practical studies.

Animating The Imagination (single honours only)

A theoretical module which aims to introduce you to the fundamental elements of the creative potential, influence and significance of animation and film within twentieth century culture and to highlight their contemporary relevance. The module aims to provide an overview of the emergence of film and animation in relation to some of the key debates, influences and movements which shaped them - enabling you to make connections between early and contemporary animation and film.

Introduction to Television Production (single honours only)

This module aims to introduce you to the safe and effective use of television and location video equipment and techniques relating to their use. In addition, the module aims to provide opportunities for you to develop organisational, creative, technical and team skills and to integrate initial theoretical concepts within practical productions.

Introduction to Film Production

Introduction to Film Production introduces you to the safe and effective use of digital film production equipment and techniques providing opportunities to develop organisational, creative and technical skills within the context of digital film production. The module provides opportunities to develop team skills and to integrate theoretical concepts within practical production. 

Introduction to Radio Production (single honours only)

This module aims to introduce you to the safe and effective use of radio. It aims to provide opportunities for you to develop organisational, creative and technical skills within the context of radio and television production. Additionally it aims to provide opportunities to develop team skills within radio production and to integrate initial theoretical concepts within practical productions.

Year 2

Creative Practice - Television (single honours only)

This module aims to build upon the production skills and learning, developed at year one by extending the range of facilities and specialist equipment available to year two students. The nature and length of practical assignments has also been extended; to allow you the opportunity to develop and refine technical skills within their chosen medium of TV production and to develop skills within specialist production roles where appropriate. Finally, this module will continue to combine and integrate practical and theoretical concepts, by making connections with intellectual discourse explored within year two theory modules.

Creative Practice - Film (single honours only)

This module aims to build upon the production skills and learning of year one, by extending the range of facilities and equipment available to students and through developing links with level two theory modules. Practical tuition will provide the opportunity for students to produce their coursework in a variety of formats. Where possible, you will be given the choice to work in more than one medium.

Creative Practice - Radio (single honours only)

The module aims to build on the production skills and learning of Year One in part by extending the range of facilities and equipment available to you. The module aims to combine and integrate practical and theoretical considerations by making connections with the work undertaken in year two theory modules.

Year 3

Specialised Study by Practical Project - Film/Television/Radio (single honours only)

The module aims to develop further the technical and creative skills learned in year two, and apply them to the production of practical projects in film, radio, video or animation. The module also aims to present you with opportunities to critically integrate theory with practical production work. Through the projects, ideas of self-responsibility, organisation and problem solving skills will be developed.

Likely optional modules

This is an illustrative sample of some of the options we offer. Please note that not all optional modules will run each year.

Year 2

Animation Practice

This module aims to introduce students to model and drawn animation techniques and equipment.

American Independent Cinema

The module aims to develop a conceptual and critical knowledge and understanding of American Independent cinema since the end of the 1950s to its current position in relation to mainstream Hollywood cinema. To examine the work of specific filmmakers who might be regarded as pioneers of the independent cinema aesthetic, including, John Cassavetes, Martin Scorsese, Jim Jarmusch, John Sayles, Spike Lee, and to reflect critically on what might constitute that aesthetic and explore the oppositional, transgressive, auteurist, aesthetic of Independent cinema and its symbiotic relationship with the mainstream.

Editing: Practice of Theory

The module aims to identify the chronological and historical development of editing procedure and provide a practical context for the co-requisite Editing: Theory of Practice module. The module marries practice and theory in the development of your critical understanding of the process of editing through the production of short visual exercises as a key element of their learning experience. In the production of your own exercises you will develop your understanding of the importance of the editing process in cinematic and television production. The module aims to develop your critical understanding of practical editing techniques through the undertaking of a range of relevant post-production methods.

Editing Theory of Practice

The module aims to develop a critical understanding of editing through the analysis of a range of relevant cinematic texts. The module aims to identify the chronological and historical development of editing procedure and provide a theoretical context for the year two practical production modules.

Scriptwriting Practice

This module aims to introduce techniques of practical scriptwriting and build your creative skills to make original and imaginative dramatic narratives.

Cinematography: Designing The Frame

This module examines the craft of cinematography by placing it as a practice with both theoretical and historical contexts. The module aims to integrate theoretical concepts within a practical production context by providing the opportunity to develop your photographic techniques, creative skills and understanding relevant to image making. The module will provide a focused study of the key cinematic trends, debates and changes in technology, through examining the work of influential photographers and cinematographers in relation to contemporary practice. In practical coursework you will have the opportunity to understand key principles of photography addressing ideas of form and content in relation to learning about composition, lighting control, exposure, colour theory and production technologies.

Modern Science Fiction Cinema

The aims of this module are to develop your responses to film by focusing upon the genre of sf. This will refine critical and theoretical notions such as genre theory, the sublime, estrangement, blockbusters, art film, camp, postmodernism, virtuality and representation in relation to the specific context of the sf film since 1968, where necessary connecting this to specialised critical vocabulary.

Laughing Matters

The aims of this module are to develop your responses to comedy, humour and laughter, both as a means of providing pleasure to an audience and as a means of structure a given text. The comic will be examine both in terms of a variety of theoretical positions on comedy, the comic, humour and laughter and the socio-political contexts in which it takes place.

Year 3

Individual Study

The ‘Individual Study’ module is designed to support your extended research into an area of study proposed by yourself and agreed with your tutor. As well as this specific study, more general shared tuition will focus on research skills and methodology, introducing you to the skills of extended academic research.

Contemporary TV Drama

The module aims to develop your critical and conceptual knowledge and understanding of contemporary television drama and the way in which its evolving forms impact on its consumption and definition. Additionally, the module aims to situate contemporary television drama as a process actively participating in the larger cultural systems of which it is a part.

Professional Perspectives In The Creative Industries

The module aims to prepare students for entry in to the creative industries by developing awareness of key skills in presentation, pitching, funding applications, CV writing, portfolio management and team working and in helping you to draw upon the strengths of your practical and theoretical work in your other modules.

The module aims to enhance employability by bringing you into contact with industry professionals who will help to set project briefs and offer feedback on your work

The Cinematic City

The module aims to develop your critical and conceptual knowledge and understanding of the meanings of space and place in contemporary U.S. cinema, with particular attention to the construction of the cinematic city. Additionally, the module aims to situate the representations of space and place in the cinematic city as a process actively participating in the larger cultural systems of which they are a part.

Utopianism In Cinema

This module aims to introduce you to critical discourse surrounding Utopian representation and to develop your ability to critically engage with social dreaming in a number of relevant cinematic texts. You will be introduced to a variety of definitions to help you distinguish between Utopias, anti-Utopias, critical Utopias and Dystopias, and you will be encouraged to interpret their significance and situate cinematic utopianism as a process actively participating in the larger cultural systems of which it is a part.

EDITING: History, Technique, Art and Craft

The course aims to further your critical awareness of editing theory and practice through the analysis of a range of relevant cinematic texts, practical productions and technical exercises. You will be introduced to a number of key issues and debates concerning editing and will consider how meanings are produced through image and sound technique, art and craft and these lead to collective interpretation/reading. The course will advance further the chronological and historical development of editing procedure and provide a theoretical context for the year three specialised practical courses. Through a series of lectures and practical workshops, this course should promote active critical debate, practical and technical knowledge and further inform further students’ production work.

Real-time Visual Performance

The module aims to develop your critical and conceptual knowledge and understanding of the history and practice of real-time visual performance. Additionally, the module aims to enable to you to develop your own creative practice in real-time visual performance through the development of skills and knowledge required to produce and perform visuals for live events, stage, music performances, gallery installations and/or to produce digital artworks outside normal cinematic conventions. Finally, the module aims to situate the real-time visual performance in relation to other audio visual practices in the arts, within both historical and contemporary contexts.

Media Production (combined honours)

This optional module is available only to students who are taking Specialised Study by Practical Project (20 credits). It offers the Joint Honours student an opportunity to develop vocational skills in the field of production. The module situates the media production process within a ‘professional’ context and provides the opportunity to produce a small commercially focused project that evidences the student’s ability to accommodate the needs of a client and their audience. The practical work will be situated in either advertising, corporate presentation or the production of training materials.

Through project work, ideas of self-responsibility, organisation and problem solving skills will be also be extended enabling students to develop skills required for employment and their own continued creative and intellectual development.

Students become editors, runners, radio producers, camera operators, teachers, directors, freelancers and also go on to a variety of graduate-level jobs.

Tuition Fees for 2018/19 have not yet been finalised - please read the 2018/19 Tuition Fee Statement for further information regarding 2018/19 tuition fees and year on year fee increases.

Fees

The 2017/18 annual tuition fees for this course are:

 UK/EUOverseas
Full-time £9,250* £11,000**
Part-time £4,625 N/A

Tuition fees for all courses are payable on an annual basis, except where stated.

*Full-time courses which have a Foundation Year 0 will have a 2017/18 UK/EU tuition fee of £6,165 in Year 0.

**Tuition Fee Scholarship discounts of £1,500 are available to eligible overseas students. Visit the International webpages for further information.

Please read the 2017/18 Tuition Fee Statement for further information regarding 2017/18 tuition fees and year on year fee increases

Further information

Additional course costs

Although we aim to minimise any additional costs to students over and above the course tuition fee, there will be some additional costs which students are expected to meet.

Costs applicable to all students

CategoryDescription
Text books Own purchase text books
Travel to other sites Where travel to other sites is required, this will be payable by the student
Library Fees and Fines Where students fail to return loaned items within the required time they will be responsible for the cost of any Library Fees and Fines applicable
Printing & Photocopying The cost of printing and photocopying undertaken by students to support their individual learning are payable by the student
Graduation ceremonies It is free for the student to attend the ceremony itself. Guest tickets and robe hire / photography are additional costs payable by the student

Course specific costs

CategoryDescription
Text books No purchase is mandatory.

General principle policy

The University’s general principles policy for additional course fees are set out here

CategoryIncluded in the tuition feeAdditional cost to student
Field trips (including trips abroad and trips to museums, theatres, workshops etc) Yes, if the trip contributes to the course (whether it is part of an optional or compulsory module), but not including food and drink. Yes, if the trip is not an essential part of the course but is offered as an enhancement or enrichment activity, or for a student’s personal development.
Travel and accommodation costs for placements  No

Travel and accommodation costs for professional placements within the Education and Health & Wellbeing Faculties.

Travel and accommodation costs for other work placements. 
Text books No Own purchase text books.
DBS / Health checks No Yes
Professional Body registration No Yes
Travel to other sites (e.g. travel to swimming pool for lessons) No Yes
Clothing / Kit Yes, where the clothing / kit is essential for Health & Safety reasons. Yes, where the clothing is kept by the student and not essential for health and safety reasons.
Learning materials Essential learning materials (excluding text books) in connection with the course. Additional materials beyond the standard provision essential for the course or where the costs are determined by the student’s area of interest and the outputs are retained by the student.
Library fees and fines No Yes
Printing and photocopying No Yes
Social events No, unless the event forms an essential part of the course. Yes, unless the event forms an essential part of the course.
Graduation ceremonies It is free for the student to attend the ceremony itself. Guest tickets and robe hire/ photography are additional costs payable by the student.

Composition of the Course

You will be taught by a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, screenings and workshops. For a standard 20 credit module you can expect 60 hours academic direction and 140 hours practice based and independent learning, with one to one and group tutorials in addition.

Academic input

Of the full time staff delivering the Film, Radio and Television Programme two are Principal Lecturers and the rest Senior Lecturers. This experienced team is supplemented by a variety of industry professionals who contribute as sessional lecturers or guest speakers.

You will be assessed by a combination of practical and written assessments. In theory modules this is almost entirely by essay or dissertation although there is one exam in the first year. In practical modules you will normally be assessed by practical project accompanied by a written evaluation.

We now have planning permission to build a new £12m arts facility in Canterbury, equipped with the latest technology and bespoke learning spaces for our arts and humanities students.

We expect our new arts building to open on the main campus in September 2018, with building work starting this summer.

Our main campus in Canterbury has city centre facilities on its doorstep and, of course, you will benefit from all the new arts building has to offer.


We have a specialist TV studio and Radio Studios, excellent post-production and animation facilities. BBC Radio Kent have a studio in the Powell Building.

The Film, Radio and Television Programme has an industry advisory panel made up of industry contacts and alumni of the FRTV programme who are now high ranking members of the media industry who advise on curriculum design and who also contribute to the third year module Professional Perspectives in The Creative Industries, where they provide the briefs that the students then formulate a pitch in response to, which they deliver to the professionals. Students go on to take up internships, work placements and full time employment on the strength of the work they produce in that module.

The panel advises on curriculum design and members also contribute to the third year module Professional Perspectives in The Creative Industries. This innovative module provides our students with the opportunity to do a mock pitch to module tutors giving them a strong sense of having responded to a “real world” creative brief.

The module was used in a recent HEA report as an example of best practice in directed independent learning.

UK/EU

Full-time study

Apply via UCAS

Need some help?

For advice on completing your application please contact the Admissions Enquiry Team:

Email: admissions@canterbury.ac.uk
Tel:+44 (0)1227 782900

Fact file

UCAS code

  • P307 Film, Radio and Television Studies with Foundation Year

Institutional code

  • C10

Length

  • 4 years full-time

Starts

  • September 2017

Entry requirements

  • Candidates should have studied at level 3 and have attained 48 UCAS Tariff points, although those without formal qualifications will be considered.

    You do not need to have significant prior knowledge of Arts and Humanities related subjects but should be motivated to study the subject.

Location

School

More about

Print or share this page

Connect with us

Last edited: 12/06/2017 14:14:00